EPC FAQs

What is an EPC?

EPC, or Energy Performance Certificate, provides detailed information on making a building more energy efficient as well as reducing its carbon footprint. All buildings, offered for sale or rent in the UK require an EPC. EPCs assess a wide range of factors, including whether or not the house has double glazed windows, or loft insulation and should be a factor in selecting a future home.

What is the EPC's 'Energy Efficiency Rating'?

To make an educated decision about the running costs of a house or flat, a buyer can review the property's EPC 'Energy Efficiency Rating' which is an 'A to G' rating similar to those found on modern appliances. This 'Energy Efficiency Rating' gives buyers a clear and graphical assessment of the property's energy consumption and indicates the savings that could be achieved with the correct energy-saving measures in place.

An EPC's 'A to G' assessment:

  • A (92-100) - The most efficient rating, indicating both low CO2 emissions and lower running costs.
  • D (55-68) - This is the average grade for properties across the UK.
  • G (1-20) - The least efficient.
  • Properties which receive a 'G' are likely to be costly to run, and will need urgent improvements to cut fuel expenses.

Do you need an EPC?

If you are selling, renting or building a property* then you are legally required to provide an EPC or 'Energy Performance Certificate'.

EPCs are conducted by qualified 'Domestic Energy Assessors' and they will need to visit the property to conduct a thorough assessment before producing the certificate.

EPCs must be supplied for both residential and non-residential buildings in the following circumstances:

If you are selling a property

It is the responsibility of the seller to supply an EPC to any potential buyer for which the seller is not permitted to charge the buyer.

If you are letting a property

If you are renting a property out in its entirety (i.e. you are not simply renting a spare room) then you are legally required to supply an EPC to the tenant at no charge.

If you are building a property

The developer must supply an EPC to the purchaser at no charge.

In all cases the EPC MUST be commissioned before marketing commences the EPC is to be completed using 'reasonable efforts' within 7 days of ordering if the EPC has not been completed in 7 days an extension for 21 days is allowed.

Note - By law you must produce the EPC 28 days after paying for it and it must be commissioned before any form of marketing commences. Adherence is policed by Trading Standards Officers who are empowered to ask marketing agents to produce evidence that the EPC has been commissioned. EPC's are valid for 10 years.

*a building or property is defined as a building with a roof and walls. If its ‘indoor climate’ is controlled by energy use, it will need an EPC. Central heating, air conditioning or mechanical ventilation are examples of methods used to control this. In contrast, a standalone garage or a garden shed would likely not require an EPC.

What is an EPC?

EPC, or Energy Performance Certificate, provides detailed information on making a building more energy efficient as well as reducing its carbon footprint. All buildings, offered for sale or rent in the UK require an EPC. EPCs assess a wide range of factors, including whether or not the house has double glazed windows, or loft insulation and should be a factor in selecting a future home.

What is the EPC's 'Energy Efficiency Rating'?

To make an educated decision about the running costs of a house or flat, a buyer can review the property's EPC 'Energy Efficiency Rating' which is an 'A to G' rating similar to those found on modern appliances. This 'Energy Efficiency Rating' gives buyers a clear and graphical assessment of the property's energy consumption and indicates the savings that could be achieved with the correct energy-saving measures in place.

An EPC's 'A to G' assessment:

  • A (92-100) - The most efficient rating, indicating both low CO2 emissions and lower running costs.
  • D (55-68) - This is the average grade for properties across the UK.
  • G (1-20) - The least efficient.
  • Properties which receive a 'G' are likely to be costly to run, and will need urgent improvements to cut fuel expenses.

Do you need an EPC?

If you are selling, renting or building a property* then you are legally required to provide an EPC or 'Energy Performance Certificate'.

EPCs are conducted by qualified 'Domestic Energy Assessors' and they will need to visit the property to conduct a thorough assessment before producing the certificate.

EPCs must be supplied for both residential and non-residential buildings in the following circumstances:

If you are selling a property

It is the responsibility of the seller to supply an EPC to any potential buyer for which the seller is not permitted to charge the buyer.

If you are letting a property

If you are renting a property out in its entirety (i.e. you are not simply renting a spare room) then you are legally required to supply an EPC to the tenant at no charge.

If you are building a property

The developer must supply an EPC to the purchaser at no charge.

In all cases the EPC MUST be commissioned before marketing commences the EPC is to be completed using 'reasonable efforts' within 7 days of ordering if the EPC has not been completed in 7 days an extension for 21 days is allowed.

Note - By law you must produce the EPC 28 days after paying for it and it must be commissioned before any form of marketing commences. Adherence is policed by Trading Standards Officers who are empowered to ask marketing agents to produce evidence that the EPC has been commissioned. EPC's are valid for 10 years.

*a building or property is defined as a building with a roof and walls. If its ‘indoor climate’ is controlled by energy use, it will need an EPC. Central heating, air conditioning or mechanical ventilation are examples of methods used to control this. In contrast, a standalone garage or a garden shed would likely not require an EPC.